Wellness

The Art Of Saying "No"

Exhausted. Over-committing. Tired.

You've had a long week, a close friend asks you to go for a drink and a bite on a Friday night. You really don't want to go but you agree anyways. You had plans to hit a workout on Saturday morning but the night went later than you anticipated and now you're exhausted. Should have said no to that drink but you committed.

Far too many times, we over-commit ourselves to things that we really don't want to do. Who suffers? You. We need time to do the things that we love to keep us mentally and physically happy, for the long run. This goes both ways. If you're tired and need a rest day, don't let the guilt of missing a training day force you into the gym. A rest day will give you that much needed energy so that you are able to hit the next one hard.

"But that's easier said than done". Right, so how do we actually make time for ourselves without feeling guilty about letting down your friends, family, etc.
 

Talk to someone you're close to and tell them you're feeling exhausted. Recognize you are saying yes to too many things. Have this person hold you accountable to making time for yourself.


Slow down your decision making. It's easy to say yes and back out later but that doesn't work well for either parties. Ask if you can think about it and get back them. Don't dwell on it though, make a decision. The sooner, the better. Deliver your decision.

 

If it's a no, don't be afraid to let them know why. Most of the time, people will understand that you need some "me" time.

BT rig.jpg

Having time carved out to improve yourself is important. If starting an training/nutrition program has always been something you've wanted to do but couldn't because you're already over-committing, now is the time to say no and start. Remember that self care is not selfish.